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Bold Perfection

UK hairdressers must learn to cut and style Afro hair, say new beauty regulations

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UK hairdressers must learn to cut and style Afro hair, say new beauty regulationsIt will be now be compulsory for all UK hairdressers to learn how to cut and style afro and textured hair in a long-awaited update to hairdressing regulations.

 

In a recent review of the National Occupational Standards (NOS) for hairdressing, it was found that many qualifications did not require students to learn how to cut and style afro and textured hair, resulting in a major gap in professional expertise for this demographic.

 

Now, new NOS guidelines published in June have been updated to cater for those with afro and textured hair, thanks to campaigning from the British Beauty Council.

 

In 2019, it set up a taskforce with the Hair & Beauty Industry Authority (Habia) to push for a revised NOS, which outlines practice standards for hairdressers across the UK.

 

The update to the NOS guidelines, however, has been a long time coming. In 2017, a study by Habia revealed that there were 35,704 beauty salons in the UK, but only 302 Afro-Caribbean salons.

 

a woman holding a child s hair

 

Radio 1 DJ Clara Amfo spoke out about the issue in an Instagram post that same year after the Selfridges’ Braid Bar invited her in for a free hairstyling session despite the fact that it had very little representation of black women with afros or textured hair on their social media platforms.

 

“Whilst I’m flattered that the Braid bar love my style, I couldn’t help but slow eye roll and LOL at the naive audacity of this offer,” Amfo wrote in the post.

 

“When I looked on this account 90 per cent of the images are of white women with European hair, Women like me are NOT represented here,” she continued before going on to accuse the brand of cultural appropriation.

 

“To explain further the Braid bar general creative aesthetic is clearly influenced by popular R&B, Hip Hop and Dancehall culture, which originates from black women....yet there are barely any black women, particularly with hair texture like mine on their page.”

 

The company subsequently issued an apology to Amfo after having met with her personally to discuss the issue at length.

 

Commenting on the new standards, Helena Grzesk, chief operating officer at The British Beauty Council said she is pleased that NOS for hairdressing will finally be more inclusive.

 

She said: “We share Habia’s belief that the hair and beauty industry can and should be truly inclusive, but until now, tens of thousands of hairdressers have no qualifications in cutting and styling afro and textured hair.

 

 

“We have supported the industry and Habia, ever since we launched in 2018, for the standards to reflect and represent the diverse range of hair types and textures of clients across the hair and beauty sector.

 

“Our aim is to amplify and celebrate the voices of all the communities the industry serves to ensure each and every one of us feels seen, heard, valued and excited to engage with the beauty industry. We are naturally delighted that the new standards have now been approved.”

 

Reference: Independent: Olivia Petter

Home Remedies For Fungal Nails

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Home Remedies For Fungal Nails

Folklore, propagated by the internet, is full of "sure-fire cures" for fungal nails. These home remedies include bleach, distilled vinegar, herbs, mentholated petroleum jelly, disinfectan cleaner, and even urine. These so-called cures may be worse than the disease.

  • While some may kill fungus, they can also harm healthy skin and lead to serious complications, including infection. While some may kill fungus, they can also harm healthy skin and lead to serious complications, including infection.A physician or podiatrist can diagnose a fungal infection and determine if medical treatment is warranted. Yet, medical treatment of toenail fungus is rarely quick or easy. 
  • The fact is, fungal infections are stubborn and require time, expense (especially if the treatment is not covered by your health insurance  plans) and some risk (Oral antifugals, for example are hard on the liver.) At the same time, however, medical treatment is the best and sometimes the only way to successfully treat fungal nails.

  • How aggressively should a toenail fungus be treated?
  • That determination is best made in cnsultation with a podiatrist, dermatologist, or medical doctor who commonly treats the condition. There are a number of considerations that should factor into the decision. The appearance of nails, while extremely embarrassing for some, is often not sufficient reason in and of itself to use expensive medications with potentially strong side effects. 
  • A fungal infection that involves more than one nail, causes pain or a secondary bacterial infection, and has been confirmed with a fungal culture is more likely to be considered a condition requiring treatment by both medical professionals and insurance providers. And as mentioned earlier, systemic medical conditions such as diabetes and circulation disorders may make it more important to treat the fungal infection aggressively with prescription medications. 

  • Conversely, because the oral medication can cause liver side effects, some people who take multiple medications for chronic conditions may not be able to take antifungal medication safely, however bad the condition of their nails. Fortunately, most people with fungal nail infections have a relatively minor infection that does not require prescription medication. 
  • They tend to do very well with nonprescription topical medications and regular nail trimming. For these people, the fungal nails are more of a nuisance than a medical condition requiring aggressive medical treatment. 

Reference: Feet For Life: Paul Langer: DPM

Fungal Nails

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Fungal Nails

 

Probably the most common complaint regarding the toenails is fungal infection. The same fungus that causes athlete's foot can also cause changes to the toenails. This fungus lives on the skin and is usually kept in check by the immune system.

 

Occasionally, however, it evades our immune system and penetrates the nail.Probably the most common complaint regarding the toenails is fungal infection. The same fungus that causes athlete's foot can also cause changes to the toenails.

 

This fungus lives on the skin and is usually kept in check by the immune system. Occasionally, however, it evades our immune system and penetrates the nail.As the fungus advances under the toenail, it causes the colour of the nail to change, as well as making it grow thicker and more brittle.

 

Most complaints about fungal nails are directed  at the unsightly appearance of the affected nails. But, for some, the toenails can start to hurt  as they become thicker and more brittle.

 

 

 

Fungal infections also produce debris under the nail that looks like dry, flaking skin. In some cases, infected nails loosen from the nail bed.Some nail changes can mimic a fungal infection, which is why a suspected funal infection should be evaluated by a podiatrist or dermatologist.

 

Accurate diagnosis is important to ensure proper treatment. And the only true way a podiatrist can diagnose the presence of fungus with certainty is to order a lab test on a sample of the affected nail.

 

 

Who's at risk for Fungal Nails? 

 

There are some common traits that those with fungal toenail infections often share. It seems that those who often get athlete's foot and those whose feet tend to sweat profusely are more likely to get fungal toenails.

 

Keeping the skin cool and dry and treating athlete's foot aggressively are important  for minimizing toenail problems.Occasionally, fungal nails have a hereditary component. Some people are simply born more susceptible to fungal infections than others.

 

I am often asked if nail fungus is easily spread. The answer is, it depends--on your immune system and other factors. I've seen patients who were married to partners with fungus in all ten toenails  but who did not develop symptoms themselves.

 

And then Iv'e seen whole families affected by fungal nails. If you are prone to fungal infections in your nails, you must be especially diligent about your foot hygiene.

 

Reference: Great Feet For Life: Paul Langer : DPM

Fungal Nails - Treatment Of Fungal Nails

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Fungal Nails- Treatment Of Fungal Nails

 

Fungal toenails are notoriously hard to treat. Topical medications alone are not often effective. Most are unable to penetrate through the nail to completely eradicate the fungus living in the nail bed. The only topical antifugal nail treatment currently approved by the FDA is a medication called Penlac.

 

Oral antifugal medications cannot cure fungal infections, they can help treat them. Antifugal topicals often slow the advancement of the fungus, improve the appearance of the nails, and soften the nails, making them easier to care for.Common over- the - counter antifugal medications include Nony X, Fungi Care, and Mycocide.

 

These medications should be applied twice daily to the far end of the nail while pointing the tooes upward. Applying the medication with the toes pointed upward helps draw the medication under the nail.

 

 

 

Oral antifugal medications are available by prescriptions only. These medications are expensive, and health Insurance Plans often have strict requirements for prescription approval.For most people Medicare does not cover the cost of oral antifugal medication for treating the toenails. other insurers require that a lab confirm the infection, that the condition is causing pain, than more than one nail be infected, or that other conditions, such as Diabetes or circulation disorders, also be present.

 

Those with more serious syptoms or systemic conditions are more vulnerable to secondary bacterial infections caused by severe fungal nails.Treating fungal toenails can be a frustrating experience. There is no quick or easy treatment. Diligently treating the nails twice daily with a topical medication for six to ten months may achieve only mild improvement. Even the most effective treatment-prescription oral medication -requires taking a pill daily for three to four months for a healthy nail to gradually replace the fungal nail.

 

 

In addition to using medications, adressing fungus that lives in the shoes is an important part of minimizing the risk of fungal nails, treating them, and preventing recurrence after treatment. A study conducted at the University of Minnesota found that throwing away old shoes and socks after toenails had improved resulted in less chance of reinfection.

 

While this might be expensive and difficult ( most of us have shoes that are hard to part with), fungus accumulates in shoes over time (and socks to a lesser degree, as socks can be washed), increasing the risk of infection and reinfection.This risk is heightened for people who live in warm climates or who have feet that sweat a lot. Wear clean socks every day. You shouild change your socks several times a day when it is warm and if you have sweaty feet. Air out shoes and expose them to sunlight to minimize the dark, moist conditions in which fungi thrive.

 

 

If you have a fungal infection, you should be especially careful with nail-care instruments to decrease the risk of spreading the fungus to other nails. It is best to use two sets of instruments, especially nail clippers - one for the fungal nails and the other for the healthy nails, and a third set should be used for care of the fingernails.Instruments used to treat fungal nails should be discarded following successful treatment.Fungus thrives in dark moist environments,airing out shoes and opening them up to direct sunlight is a great way to kill the fungus that may be living inside.

 

Reference: Great Feet For Life: Paul Langer : DPM

Ingrowing Toe Nails - 2 - painful Bleeding 

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Ingrowing Toe Nails - 2- painful Bleeding 

 

The inflammation and pressure from an ingrown nail border can, occasionally, cause a red, painful area that bleeds easily next to te nail.  Called a pyogenic granuloma, it is essentially a capillary bed that has enlarged and raised above the skin. 

 

The inflammation and pressure from an ingrown nail border can, occasionally, cause a red, painful area that bleeds easily next to the nail.  

  • Called a pyogenic granuloma, it is essentially a capillary bed that has enlarged and raised above the skin. In addition to the pain and bleeding it causes, a pyogenic granuloma can also invite infection. It should be treated in a clinical setting as soon as possible.

If you cannot see a doctor right away, keep the area bandaged until you can.

 

Ingrown Nails and Bacterial Infection

 

Ingrown toenails can cause infection because they cut into the skin and allow bacteria to invade the tissue around the nail. The infection causes redness, swelling, and sometimes pustular drainage and bleeding.

 

 

Minor infections can be treated by soaking the foot with the affected toe in warm, soapy water for ten to twenty minutes, followed by applying a topical antibiotic ointment or iodiene and then bandaging the site.

  • It is best to see a doctor if the signs of infection have not resolved after one or two days. He or she will clean the site,check for and remove sharp edges or broken nail fragments embedded in the flesh, and possibly prescribe an oral antibiotic. 

Questionable Ingrown Nail Treatments

There is simply no magical topical medication that can heal and corret an ingrown nail. Over-the-counter topical medicationms may temporarily decrease pain, but they do nothing to address the underlying nail condition.

 

 

  • Popular wisdom has suggested that tucking cotton under the edge-of an ingrown nail or cutting a V-notch into the end of the nail will fix problem ingrown nails. There may be some benefit, but these techniques do not work well, especially as a permanent solution.

Current Recommendations:

  • A Bridging kit can be used to alter the curveture of the nail, this stops the nail from cutting into the underlying tissue.: R A Rose Louisy BSc. 
  • Reference: Great Feet For Life: Paul Langer : DPM

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